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Resources

Writing Science: A Book and a blog

Purpose: Save time!
Audience: Faculty who are spending hours editing graduate students' papers

3 Days to Better Storytelling - Day 1: Get Inspired

Many of our fellows have found storytelling to be a powerful tool for talking about their work and why it’s important. Recently the Leopold Leadership Program started collecting resources to help researchers tell their stories in compelling ways. This is “3 Days to better storytelling,” a 3-part blog series with tips and ideas for strengthening your storytelling skills starting today.

Listening Walk

Source: Margaret Krebs

   Purpose: Reflecting

Audience: Participants in an ongoing group: task force, lab, workshop

You've probably heard people say that they do their best thinking when walking. In fact, Stanford researchers in a study done in 2014, found that walking does boost creativity.  If you want to give participants time to think outloud and express what is emerging for them, try a Listening Walk.  

For more information, listen to this short video clip of Parker Palmer, author and educator, talking about the context of listening in academic scholarship.

3 Days to Better Storytelling: Day 2 - Prepare

Inspired by our fellows’ successes in using stories to promote change, we recently started collecting resources to help researchers tell their stories in compelling ways. This is the second in a 3-part blog series, “3 Days to better storytelling,” with tips and ideas for strengthening your storytelling skills, starting today. In part one, we learned how storytelling can make the hard job of communicating complex ideas easier. But what if you don’t see yourself as a storyteller? Does the thought of having to tell a story about your work make you shudder? Here are three things you can do to break through and get started.

Interviewing to analyze a landscape

Source: Leopold Leadership Program

   Purpose: Inquiring

Informational interviewing may be used in a variety of contexts.  This resource, developed by the Leopold Leadership program staff, is geared toward getting perspectives from multiple practitioners in order to understand a specific area of interest, or to do a landscape analysis.  Fellows are encouraged to extend their networks to understand who are the individuals within organizations, government agencies, and universities interested in similar issues.

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